Newsletter


Edition 64

I hope you and your team are well and continuing to prepare.

 

I just had Libby draw the winning ticket for Raffle 2015.1:  Garrett Croxton won the prize of one seat in any one of our two-day defensive firearm classes, plus the ammunition required for the class.  Congratulations, Garrett!  I’m looking forward to seeing you in another class!

 

To all those who purchased chances to win, thank you so much for supporting our mission.  Remember that Paladin Training, Inc. is a tax-exempt non-profit under IRS Section 501(c)(3).  All gifts are tax deductible.

Please continue to train and get ready; physically, mentally and spiritually!

 

Train hard!   Put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Update: Emergency Preparedness

I hope to have the first meeting the evening of either Tuesday 1 September or Thursday 3 September.  At the moment, I’m waiting on a response to my space request.  Soon as I get it I’ll send out a bulletin to give everyone as much of a heads up as possible.

Notice: Sheepdog Safety Training Seminar, Mount Pleasant, SC

Christians, especially anyone in a leadership position at a church, should flock (sorry, couldn’t resist) to Seacoast Church in Mount Pleasant, SC for the Sheepdog Safety Training seminar being conducted 28 & 29 AUGUST.
Speakers include LTC Dave Grossman, USA, ret.,  Jimmy Meeks and Carl Chinn.For more on the seminar: Sheepdog Mount Pleasant

The price of these seminars is usually $99 per person, but for this event, payment of the fee will allow you to bring one additional person AT NO CHARGE.

SC Law Enforcement:  The SCCJA will award 8.5 CLEE hours for attending this event.

I’m really looking forward to this.  I’ve never met Jimmy Meeks but have greatly enjoyed our recent phone conversations.  Dave Grossman is one of the most informative and entertaining speakers I’ve ever heard.  I  hope to see you there.

To register, please use this link:  SEMINAR

Paladin Training will receive a portion of your entry fee if you use this link.  And thank you for supporting our mission.

Upcoming Training: Defensive Carbine-1, 26 & 27 SEP

I am SO looking forward to this class.  DC-1 is probably my second favorite class after UBC.  We have a lot of fun, plus I believe we do it well.  If you want to learn how to use your rifle or carbine to defend ‘hearth and home’ from the barbarians, this should be on your calendar.  Ditto if you just want to learn how to operate the thing competently.

It is a ‘basic’ class and beginners are welcome.  At the same time, experienced shooters will benefit from a refresher in the fundamentals.  I’ve been taking and conducting training for more than 40 years and I promise you I still get more benefit from taking the occasional basic class than I do more advanced classes.  Beware anything with ‘advanced’ attached to it.  What wins fights is the quick and competent application of the basics.

Caveat

Basic Carbine Operator is a soft prerequisite for DC-1, but we don’t force it.  With a training envelope of 7 to 300 yards, BCO is THE class to really learn the fundamentals of marksmanship… to get the most, accuracy-wise, from your carbine.  From the standpoint of development, I believe it’s better to learn to shoot properly before learning to shoot fast.  If you’re new to shooting long guns and skip BCO to go straight to DC-1, I think you’re hurting yourself.  But, again, we don’t force it and beginners are welcome.

Expect a lot of movement.  We’ll also have a low-light segment and, of course, the dreaded MGM Attack Target will show up and challenge you.

For more details: Defensive Carbine 1

Reminder: Safe Family / Safe Church Crime Prevention Seminar, Hartsville, SC

Terry Gainey and I hope to see you at the First Church of God on Kelleytown Road, Hartsville, SC on 22 AUG.
Full details are in the training bulletin sent out on 5 AUG.   Let me know if you didn’t get it and I’ll send you another.

The fee is $20.  If you’d like to register:   undefinedDon’t forget that payment at the door is $25.

SHOOTING TIP:  FOLLOW-THROUGH

Quick review.  The seven fundamentals of marksmanship (as we teach them) are:
1. Platform
2. Mount (alternately, Grip when dealing with handguns)
3. Sight Alignment
4. Sight Picture
5. Breath Control
6. Trigger Control
7. Follow-ThroughOf the seven, Sight Alignment and Trigger Control are the most important.  Follow-Through is usually given short treatment, so let’s talk about it because it IS important and it incorporates both Sight Alignment and Trigger Control.

Dictionary.com defines ‘Follow-Through’ as:
1. The completion of a motion, as in the stroke of a tennis racket.
2. The portion of such a motion after the ball has been hit.
3. The act of continuing a plan, project, scheme, or the like, to its completion.

I think all three have some relevance here, so I’m going to restate them like this:
1. The completion of an act, as in the act of firing a gun.
2. The portion of such an act after the shot has been fired.
3. The act of continuing a shot to its completion.

Early in my career as a student of the gun, I got the notion that Follow-Through is most important from the standpoint of Number 2 above.  That is, Follow-Through is important because you can negatively affect the shot, through movement in the Mount, after the shot has been fired but before the bullet has left the barrel.  The advice given by instructors and coaches was usually this:  Continue to do what you were doing while the shot was being fired after the shot was fired until the bullet exits the muzzle and you can no longer affect the shot.  Being in the service, that advice above was usually delivered with great enthusiasm and much more coarsely.

So, Follow-Through includes the admonition not to add any additional steps or movement into the act of firing a gun.  Maintain — as in ‘don’t change’ — your Mount until the sights are back on target and the trigger is prepped.

The most common shooting error charts have a list of 8 things, like ‘heeling’, ‘pushing’, ‘jerking’, etc.  Most of the errors listed deal with the accuracy problems caused by the shooter adding movement while the bullet is still in the barrel.

Remember, the purpose of the Mount (Grip) is threefold:
1. To minimize movement of the gun prior to and during the trigger press.
2. To ensure the gun moves in a consistent and repeatable fashion during the recoil impulse.
3. To help the gun return to the target naturally and w/o any additional effort on our part.

There’s more to it

When is a shot complete?
1. The bullet has left the barrel and we cannot influence its flight anymore, good or bad.
2. The sights are back on the target after the recoil impulse.
3. The trigger is prepped (all slack out), ready for a follow up shot should it be necessary.In the context of the typical close range self-defense scenario, Follow-Through has less to do with accuracy than with getting ready for the next shot and that’s critical because, knowing what we know about stopping mechanisms, we can assume the previous shot didn’t immediately stop the attack.  It might, though, and that’s why we have to control ourselves along with the trigger.  We can’t just start launching rounds downrange in a panic or according to some prearranged plan.

Standard Response?

Back in the day, some taught something called a ‘standard response’, that is, if you had to fire your weapon, you delivered the Standard Response — however many rounds that might be according to the instructor, department policy, etc. —  and then evaluated the situation to see if more shots were necessary.  As far as I know, reality has caused the Standard Response to go the way of the Dodo Bird.  I hope no one teaches that technique anymore.  But, if Paladin Training had to verbalize a standard response, it would sound like this:
If someone needs to be shot, begin shooting them immediately and don’t stop shooting them until you’re certain they no longer need to be shot anymore.Yes, that’s semi-tongue-in-cheek, but it hopefully gets across the idea that this is an open ended problem and that we must keep an open mind.  Every situation is different.  No one knows how many rounds it will take to solve your problem.  Add to that the fact that we must, because we’re the Good Guys, account for every bullet fired and you can see that we have to be in control.  We’re supposed to believe the sights are aligned on the target — not necessarily perfectly but ‘good enough’ — before we press the trigger.  Depending on the accuracy requirements of that particular shot, we  can either press the trigger confident, due to our training and experience, that the sights are on the target or we might have to take the time to confirm Sight Alignment with a Sight Picture before taking the shot.  It just depends.

So, here’s the sequence of events:
1.  The shot has been fired and the bullet is still in the barrel.  All the fundamentals to this point have been performed well enough to get a hit.   Six fundamentals down, one to go.
Follow-through requires:
2. The Grip / Mount is not changed in any way.
3. The trigger is immediately and aggressively released and allowed to travel forward far enough — with a margin of error — to reset the trigger mechanism.  This is begun while the gun is still in recoil.
4. The trigger is brought to the rear until all the slack is out and the trigger mechanism is ‘prepped’ for the next shot, should it be necessary.
5. Our Mount puts the gun back on target without any additional movement or effort on our part.
6.  Sight Alignment is achieved and confirmed, if necessary with a Sight Picture.
The shot is now complete.

The Trigger Control technique is called ‘constant contact, reset and prep’.  I believe it’s the most effective and efficient way to control the trigger.  I’ll talk about it another time.

Review

The marksmanship fundamental Follow-Through requires that we don’t do some things and, of those things we must do, we do them consistently and repeatably from shot to shot.

We don’t add any unnecessary or additional movement to the gun.

We maintain our Mount throughout the recoil impulse, making sure the movement of our trigger finger when performing the constant contact reset and prep trigger control technique doesn’t add any unnecessary or additional movement to the gun.  Our trigger finger, and only our trigger finger, moves.

Price Increases in Effect 3rd QTR 2015

Street price first, followed by the discount for Paladin alumni:
  • Intro to Defensive Handguns (IDH) – $50 (no change)
  • Utah CWP – $75 / $50 (no change)
  • SC CWP – $80 (no change)

Note:  We’re considering teaching a combined SC / UT class at some point.

Defensive Handgun 1 (DH1)       $300 / $250
Defensive Handgun 2 (DH2)      $300 / $250
Low Light Handgun (LLH)          $200 / $175
Defensive Shotgun 1 (DS1)         $300 / $250
Basic Carbine Operator (BCO)  $250 / $175
Defensive Carbine 1 (DC1)          $300 / $250
Defensive Carbine 2 (DC2)         $300 / $250
Urban Break Contact (UBC)      $600 / $500

Full time LEO will still receive a 50% discount on defensive firearm classes.

Active duty military (including SCARNG / SCANG) will continue to get a 100% discount on all defensive firearm classes.

Edition 63

I hope you and your team are well and continuing to prepare.   I believe time is short.

Below you’ll find an update on the Emergency Preparedness seminars first mentioned in the last newsletter.

There’s also exciting news about a much needed change to the Basic Carbine Operator curriculum.

In the ‘I never thought I’d say this’ category, check out the article below on a nice handgun drills Smartphone app I found.

We should be selling the last of the raffle tickets and close out Fundraiser 2015.1 very shortly.  Cost per ticket is $20 and only 50 tickets will be sold.  If you win, you get a seat in any two day defensive firearm class plus the ammo for the class.  This package can be worth up to $500.  Details below.

Lastly, consider this a gentle reminder to check out the link below in the REGULAR FEATURES section on talking to the police after a confrontation.  This is a subject you should freshen up on periodically.

Please continue to train and get ready; physically, mentally and spiritually!

Train hard!   Put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Update: Emergency Preparedness

I had a good response to the idea of a series of meetings on emergency preparedness.  The first meeting will be held at Florence Baptist Temple in Florence on either a Tuesday or Thursday evening, starting at 7 pm and ending at 10 pm.

Other details I didn’t include in the initial announcement:
1. There is no charge.
2. Please invite anyone you know that might be interested.  Just give me an idea how many people you expect to bring.

I’ll finalize the details and give those who have expressed an interest a couple of weeks notice.

Pending Curriculum Change: Basic Carbine Operator

I hope to soon be able to conduct our BCO class at a 300 yard range.  Here’s the problem we’ve always faced conducting this class:  We’re trying to teach techniques that only reveal themselves to be useful beyond 100 yards on a 100 yard range.  Moving the targets out to 300 yards should add enough challenge that you won’t be able to get a hit unless you use good technique.

It’s hard to teach a proper prone technique at 100 yards when you don’t need to use good technique to hit the target.

Put another way…
Many of us don’t have the inner discipline to work toward Greatness when Mediocrity is all the situation requires.

Dry Practice App for Smartphones

I found a nice (read ‘simple’) app for my Smartphone that should prove useful for both dry and live handgun practice, DRY PRACTICE DRILL by Sartuga Software.

Dry Practice Drill is available in both a free and ‘PRO’ version that costs $2.99.  PRO is the way to go if you want to modify any of the times in the built-in drills or add new drills.

How it works

Let’s take the first drill on the menu, ‘From the Ready 5M’:
Hit the START button and a timer starts counting down to give you time to get settled.  This ‘prep time’ is programmable.  The default is 5 seconds.  At the end of the time, you hear an audible ‘READY!’, followed by a brief interval and then the start BEEP.  At the end of the par time (which is also programmable), the stop whistle tells you time is up.If you’re curious, par time for 2 shots into the chest, starting from the ready at 5 meters, is 1.40 seconds.

You can also program the number of times you want to perform a drill, from 1 to 20 iterations.

From play.google.com:

Dry Practice Drill is a timer designed for brushing up on handgun presentation and malfunction-clearing skills. This app could not be easier to use. Just select a drill and hit the big “Start” button.
For each drill, you will be given a few seconds to prepare, an audible “ready” warning, then a start tone. Each drill ends with the ring of a bell.
Version 3 has a “Pro” option that includes drill instructions and the ability to edit and create your own drills. Pro users can edit the drill list fully with no restrictions or limits.

I see 13 drills on the menu, some starting from the ready, some from a concealed holster, some work on reloads and some on clearing malfunctions.

Here’s the big thing

It’s simple to use and simple to modify.  Listen, I am technologically challenged and if I can figure this thing out on my own, anyone can.
Google ‘Dry Practice Drill Sartuga Software’.

Last SC CWP Class This Summer…

… is scheduled for 23 – 24 JULY.  This is a Thursday and Friday class.  We’re already about half full so get your deposit in soon to ensure you have a seat.  How to do that can be found down and to the left.  Remember we have a hard cut off at 14 students.

Details can be found here: SC CWPWe will not be conducting any outside firearms training in AUGUST.

Going to Georgia?

I frequently get questions about legal carry in Georgia.  I’m sure you know GA does not honor SC’s CWP.  Here’s a helpful website:   GEORGIA

This would be a good time to make a pitch for another very useful Smartphone app, LEGAL HEAT
You can check it out here:  HEAT

Fundraiser 2015.1

  • Prize:  1 seat in any two-day defensive firearm class and 500 rounds of ammunition.
  • Cost per ticket:  $20
  • Number of tickets:  50

The drawing will be held when the 50th ticket is sold.

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Contact me for details.

Price Increases in Effect 3rd QTR 2015

Street price first, followed by the discount for Paladin alumni:
  • Intro to Defensive Handguns (IDH) – $50 (no change)
  • Utah CWP – $75 / $50 (no change)
  • SC CWP – $80 (no change)

Note:  We’re considering teaching a combined SC / UT class at some point.

Defensive Handgun 1 (DH1)       $300 / $250
Defensive Handgun 2 (DH2)      $300 / $250
Low Light Handgun (LLH)          $200 / $175
Defensive Shotgun 1 (DS1)         $300 / $250
Basic Carbine Operator (BCO)  $250 / $175
Defensive Carbine 1 (DC1)          $300 / $250
Defensive Carbine 2 (DC2)         $300 / $250
Urban Break Contact (UBC)      $600 / $500

Full time LEO will still receive a 50% discount on defensive firearm classes.

Active duty military (including SCARNG / SCANG) will continue to get a 100% discount on all defensive firearm classes.

Edition 62

I hope you and your team are well and continuing to prepare.

 

Would you be interested in participating in a study group on Emergency Preparedness?  I’m considering hosting an ongoing series of meetings on that very broad subject.  I can’t say more about the venue until I have some idea how many people might be attending.

 

I anticipate discussion on subjects like amateur radio, gardening and water storage, etc.  It all depends on what you consider a likely ’emergency’.

 

If this sounds like something you might like to participate in (or contribute to as a Subject Matter Expert), please let me know.

 

Please continue to train and get ready; physically, mentally and spiritually!

 

Train hard!   Put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Defensive Carbine 1 This Weekend!

We have room in the DC1 class scheduled for 20 & 21 June.  Cost is still $250 but will go up to $300 beginning the 3rd QTR.

Here’s the training outline:
A. Safety & Emergency ProceduresB. Review: Nomenclature, function and controls

C. Review: Lubrication and maintenance procedures

D. Review: Fundamentals of combat marksmanship

E. Review: Stoppage reduction (reloading & clearing malfunctions)

F. Standard Shooting Positions (Standing, Kneeling & Prone)

G. Static Warm Up Drills

H. Zeroing (7, 25 & 100 YL)

I. Movement

J. Threats LEFT, RIGHT and TO THE REAR

K. Scanning and other tactical considerations

L. Low-light tactics and techniques

M. Low-light exercises

a. Discrimination (Threat ID / Shoot v. No-shoot)

b. Clearing malfunctions

End of Day 1

Day 2

A. Review

B. Transition

C. Unconventional shooting positions

D. Use of cover

E. Multiple Targets

F. Moving Targets

G. Range tear down and police call

End of Day 2

 

You’ll need 400 to 500 rounds of ammunition for your carbine.  Ammo prices are down.  This is a good time to make up some of the training you’ve been putting off.

Pre-requisite:  BCO or outside equivalent.  Ask!
Required for:  DC2 and UBC.

Full details can be found here:  Defensive Carbine 1

Basic Designated Marksman (BDM)  AAR

BDM – I is now history.  What a great class!  Scott and Ashton did an admirable job.  I believe every student came away  confident in his / her ability to get first round hits on targets out to 600 yards.  This is a Big Thing.  If you’re the typical AR-15 owner that has never fired at a target more than 100 yards away, think of it as a 600% increase in the usefulness of your carbine.

Equipment

Rifles / calibers / number used:
AR-15 / 5.56 NATO / 6
Sako TRG-21 / .308 Winchester / 1
POF AR-10 / 7.62 NATO / 1
AIAW bolt gun / .300 WSM / 1
VEPR / 7.62 x 54R / 1
SVD / 7.62 x 54R / 1Winner of the class shoot off was Ben Snipes shooting
an Accuracy International AW in .300 WSM.  Last February, Ben and his shooting partner Nate West were  added to Paladin’s list of adjunct instructors.

The Number 2 shooter, ‘JW’, shot an AR15.  Don’t know the make or caliber.

Number 3, Kevin McKie, did a great job with the POF semi-auto in 7.62 NATO.  Kevin used relatively inexpensive Privi Partizan .308 Match ammunition in the AR-10.

Two of the AR-15’s were by relatively local (Apex, NC) maker, Barnes Precision Manufacturing.  BPM makes a first-tier AR15 and these two students did a fine job with theirs.  Pat Lee, another of our instructors currently doing Executive Protection work in Afghanistan has seen BPM M4’s in use with US Special Forces over there.

Check them out at  BARNES PRECISION and tell Andrew I sent you.

What I Learned

At this stage in my career as a student, when I go to a class I count it as time / money well spent if I pick up ONE useful thing to bring back and work on.  Keeping in mind I already have some experience shooting NRA High- Power Rifle at Known Distances from 200 to 1000 yards, here’s what I took away from BDM – I:
1.  A new prone position
2.  Proper use of the bipod
3.  Using the scope reticle for range estimation, hold-over (distance) and hold-off (wind)
In other words, for me the class was a much greater than usual value in time and money spent.  I have much to work on.  I’m sure those students that had never before shot at targets further than 100 or maybe 200 yards have a much longer list.

What’s Next?

Future BDM’s will be 20 hours long instead of 12.  Tentative dates and times for BDM – II:  9 thru 11 OCT
Lake Darpo:  Friday evening from 6 pm to 10 pm and Saturday from 9 am to 6 pm
Aynor, SC:  Sunday from 9 am to 6 pm.
Rounds:  150
Cost:  $325BDM – I filled quickly and had a standby list.  If you’d like to take the next one, contact Scott ASAP at  843-858-0360 .

Fundraiser 2015.1

Prize:  1 seat in any two-day defensive firearm class and 500 rounds of carbine ammunition (5.56 or 7.62 x 39)
Cost per ticket:  $20
Number of tickets:  50The drawing will be held when the 50th ticket is sold.

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Contact me for details.

Price Increases in Effect 3rd QTR 2015

Street price first, followed by the discount for Paladin alumni:
Intro to Defensive Handguns (IDH) – $50 (no change)
Utah CWP – $75 / $50 (no change)
SC CWP – $80 (no change)
Note:  We’re considering teaching a combined SC / UT class at some point.Defensive Handgun 1 (DH1)       $300 / $250
Defensive Handgun 2 (DH2)      $300 / $250
Low Light Handgun (LLH)          $200 / $175
Defensive Shotgun 1 (DS1)         $300 / $250
Basic Carbine Operator (BCO)  $250 / $175
Defensive Carbine 1 (DC1)          $300 / $250
Defensive Carbine 2 (DC2)         $300 / $250
Urban Break Contact (UBC)      $600 / $500

Full time LEO will still receive a 50% discount on defensive firearm classes.

Active duty military (including SCARNG / SCANG) will continue to get a 100% discount on all defensive firearm classes.

Edition 61

hope you and your team are well and continuing to prepare.  Recent events in Garland, TX and elsewhere continue to remind us that we can be called upon to demonstrate our resolve – whatever it is – and our skills – whatever they are – at any time.  None of us know when that day or that hour may come.

In my opinion, the unnamed Garland PD officer who did such an admirable job yesterday standing in the gap deserves more credit than he’s getting.  No, I haven’t heard any criticism.  His peers and superiors all have praised his skill with the handgun and their remarks usually include something like this, ‘He did just as he was trained’.

As a trainer I would never attempt to minimize the effect  good training can have — can have — on an outcome, but we have to give credit to the man (or woman) who actually puts that training to use.  To simply say, he did as he was trained’ and leave it at that is to reduce the officer’s achievement to the same level as a circus act.  No.  There has to be more to it.  Every officer of the Garland PD received the same training as this officer, but that doesn’t mean they were all capable of meeting the challenge as he did.

Being exposed to good training is not enough.  Working diligently to internalize it and make it part of your personality is the critical next step and doing that is largely the result of individual character.

So give the trainer’s their due, but give the man credit, too.  Good job, whoever you are.  You are the man.

Please continue to train and get ready; physically, mentally and spiritually!

Train hard!   Put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Designated Marksman Class Update

The DM class is now full.  Scott and Ashton are still putting names on the standby list, so call one of them if you’re interested.
I’m sure this level of interest means there will be more of these classes in the future.

I continue to receive calls and e-mails asking for details on the class, so let me remind everyone:  I’m just a student in this class.  If you want to know more or see about getting on the standby list, contact Scott.

Basic Carbine Operator This Weekend!

We still have room in the BCO this weekend (FRIDAY & SATURDAY).  We’re in luck:  Looks like it may rain!  Some good training is going to take place.  Don’t miss it!
BCO is our entry level rifle / carbine class and a pre-requisite for the more advanced defensive carbine classes.

BCO is not a tactical class.  There is no night-fire segment nor do we usually include a block on transitioning to the sidearm.  BCO is purely about rifle marksmanship fundamentals.  While it’s geared toward the AR, the skills learned will translate to any rifle or carbine and are not AR specific.

Details on the class can be found here:  BCOLOI

Fundraiser 2015.1

  • Prize:  1 seat in any two-day defensive firearm class and 500 rounds of carbine ammunition (5.56 or 7.62 x 39)
    Cost per ticket:  $20
    Number of tickets:  50

The drawing will be held when the 50th ticket is sold.

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Contact me for details.

Night Vision Class?

Let me know if you’re interested in a dedicated night vision class in mid-JUNE 2015.  Still working out the details with the instructor.

Price Increases in Effect 3rd QTR 2015

Street price first, followed by the discount for Paladin alumni:
  • Intro to Defensive Handguns (IDH) – $50 (no change)
  • Utah CWP – $75 / $50 (no change)
  • SC CWP – $80 (no change)
Note:  We’re considering teaching a combined SC / UT class at some point.
  • Defensive Handgun 1 (DH1)       $300 / $250
  • Defensive Handgun 2 (DH2)      $300 / $250
  • Low Light Handgun (LLH)          $200 / $175
  • Defensive Shotgun 1 (DS1)         $300 / $250
  • Basic Carbine Operator (BCO)  $250 / $175
  • Defensive Carbine 1 (DC1)          $300 / $250
  • Defensive Carbine 2 (DC2)         $300 / $250
  • Urban Break Contact (UBC)      $600 / $500
Full time LEO will still receive a 50% discount on defensive firearm classes.

Active duty military (including SCARNG / SCANG) will continue to get a 100% discount on all defensive firearm classes.

The Rest of the Year…

This is what we anticipate for the rest of the year:
JUL – DH1
AUG – No firearm classes
SEP – DC1
OCT – DC2
NOV – DH1
DEC – UBC

All subject to change, etc.

Edition 60

I hope you and your team had a blessed Easter!

It has been a long time since the last newsletter, so I have a lot to talk about below.  Note that the MAY Carbine Operator class is a FRIDAY / SATURDAY class.

Please continue to train and get ready; physically, mentally and spiritually!

Train hard; put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

New Class: Designated Marksman

I’ve been asked many times over the years to conduct a long range rifle class.  In a previous life I was a Designated Marksman on a military ERT and I spent over ten years in the SC Marksmanship Training Unit, regularly competing out to 600 yards, occasionally  to 1000.  So, I’ve got the background, but it’s been decades since I was active in long range work.

While the fundamentals haven’t changed, equipment sure has.  When I last competed, .30 cal was King, variable power scopes were  not to be trusted on serious rifles and a Kestrel wind meter was real cutting edge technology…  we’re talking slightly more technical than throwing rocks at each other.  Okay, that’s an exaggeration, but you get the point:  I don’t feel qualified to teach a modern intermediate or long range class, nor do I have time to get up to instructor level speed on all the new gear.

So, i was delighted a few weeks back when good friend and Paladin alumnus Scott Windham called to let me know he and his shooting partner,  Ashton Johnson, have developed a two day curriculum for an intermediate range (out to 600 yards) class.  They call it a Designated Marksman class.

I’ve had a chance to look over the outline and I’m excited about it.  You can bet I’ll be in the first class I can make.

The final details are being hammered out as to location, cost, etc., but the tentative date for the first class is 5 & 6 JUNE.

Short bios are here:  ASHTON  /  SCOTT

To learn more or register, Scott can be reached at 843-858-0360.

Looking for a Webmaster!

We’re way overdue for a complete redesign of Paladin’s website.  Anyone out there willing to donate their talent?
Paladin Training is a tax exempt non-profit under Section 501 (c)(3).

Have a Gun!

A friend recently told me he and his wife were having dinner with friends at Ruby Tuesday’s when the recent shooting took place at the mall.  He confessed that, even though most of the people at the table had CWP’s, none were armed that evening.  He described a chaotic scene with people fleeing the mall, some entering the restaurant to hide in kitchen.  Some people were getting under tables.  I imagined a herd of panicked Wildebeests fleeing a predator.  Probably not too far off the mark.

As a general rule, I recommend against getting under a table.  You lose your ability to see and maneuver.  Getting under a table in an active shooter situation is the adult version of pulling the sheets over your head when you think there’s a monster under your bed.  Unless the tablecloth is made of Kevlar, not productive.  If you don’t have any other options, better to grab a steak knife, turn out the lights and wait by the door to ambush the attacker.

My wife asked what my plan was for such a situation.   Here it is:  If I know which direction the shooting is coming from, I’m heading in the opposite direction.  If I don’t know where the shooting is coming from, I’m probably going to stay in place.  If I just have to leave but don’t know where the shooter is, I’ll consider enticing a stranger to be my rabbit:  “Hey, buddy, we need to get out of here.  Go.   I’ll be right behind you.”  If he doesn’t get shot (or shot at), then I’ll have a better idea how safe it may be in that direction.

You may think that is ruthless.  It is.  I won’t do that to an elderly person or most females, but healthy male strangers are not in my care group.  My responsibility is to get my wife and anyone else I’m responsible for to safety.

All of that changes if I believe it’s a terrorist attack.  These people are killing Americans and, in this context, EVERYONE is in my care group.  I’m going hunting and I’m going to kill until I run out of ammunition or BG’s.

Sad my wife had to ask about our plan.  That means we need to discuss some things.  Maybe you and your spousal unit need to discuss some things, too.

I digress.  The point is:  Have a gun.  You may recall the name of Tom Givens.  He’s a friend and trainer who runs an outfit called Rangemaster in Memphis, TN.  68 of Tom’s students have had to use deadly force.  65 won their gunfight with, at worst, non-life threatening injuries.  3 lost.  The reason?  They didn’t have a gun.

Training Target

A few months back Ted Deloach of Multi Drill Targets asked me to develop a training target.  Here’s the result, the PTI Target:

Looks complicated, but it’s not.  Here’s what we’ve got:
  1. For precision or warm up drills, two 6″ bullseye targets are on either side of the ‘head’.  The X ring is 1″ in diameter, the 10 ring 2″, the 9 ring is 4″ and the 8 ring is 6″ in diameter.  Knowing these distances can be helpful when getting an initial zero at close range after installing an optic or red dot site (RDS).
  2. The head is 5″ in diameter.  Target 1 inside the head represents the Ocular Window / Nasal Cavity.  The dimensions are based on actual measurement:  2.5 inches across the top is based on the pupils, center to center;  1.5 inches top to bottom on the centerline between the pupils to the bottom of the nose.
  3. Target 0 below the head represents the front of the upper and lower jaw.  Not a good target, hence the ‘0’.
  4. Target 2 is the cardiac triangle.  The distances between the corners are based on actual measurement; nipple to nipple to jugular notch.
  5. The colored circles at four corners are 4″ in diameter and numbered, targets 3 thru 6.
  6. The colored shapes inside are 2″ across and lettered A thru D.
  7. The three vertical bands inside the ‘chest’ represent aiming points for spine shots or a ‘zipper drill’; Target 8 if from the front, Target 7 if the shooter is offset to the left of center and Target 9 if the shooter is offset to the right.
  8. The two targets at the bottom of the page are useful for zeroing AR type rifles (or any platform with a similar sight-line / bore-line offset).  The space between the three dark bands is exactly 1″ across (or roughly 4 MOA).  This spacing is optimized for a 4 MOA red dot sight at a distance of 25 yards.  Center the red dot in the 1″ square and adjust your group inside the desired circle.

The center of the upper circle is 1.125″ below the center of the aiming point.  A zero here at 25 yards should give you a 50 / 200 yard zero with the typical AR15 equipped with RDS.  The center of the lower circle is 1.5″ below the center of the aiming point which should give you a 100 yard zero. 

The target itself is 23″ x 35″ and printed on heavy, weather resistant paper

Drills

Endless.  Here’s one example of a combination of drills you can do with the target (a timer, better yet, a buddy and a timer, are necessary to get the most from the practice):

  • Warm up (slow fire) from holster to target, 2 shots on the upper left bullseye target.  No time limit.  Static. Focus on technique.  Repeat x 3
    (6 shots)
  • Failure Drill (2 + 1) from holster or ready using the cardiac triangle (T2) and the ocular window / nasal cavity (T1).  No time limit.  Static.  Focus on technique.  Repeat x 3
    (9 shots)
  • Draw and fire 2 using one of the 4″ circles (T3 thru T6).  Static or with movement off the X.  Introduce a time limit to start emphasizing speed.  Repeat x 3.
    (6 shots)
  • Draw and fire 2 using a 2″ shape (TA thru TD).  Static or with movement off the X.  Use the timer.  Repeat x 3
    (6 shots)
  • Failure Drill, from the holster, with movement.  This is where a buddy comes in.  To introduce a little stress, he (she) could call the preparatory command, ‘Failure drill’, followed by ‘Standby’ then, after a pause, ‘RED!’  The shooter would draw and place two hits in Target 3 followed by an anchor shot in Target D.  Repeat alternating color combinations.
    (9 shots)

Typically Failure Drills (Mozambique) are performed on static targets by lifting the sights straight up from the chest to the head, but in reality a Failure Drill might be fired on a Threat that is moving or falling to the side.  This is the rationale behind staggering the colors.

A perfect cinematic example of a failure drill on a falling target is at the 1:15 mark here (Warning:  Language):


Zipper Drill, from the ready, 3 shots, static, no time limit.  The shooter delivers 3 shots into Target 8.  Repeat x 3, increasing speed with each iteration.
(9 shots)

Cool down (slow fire) from holster to target, 1 shot on the upper right bullseye target.  No time limit.  Static. Focus on technique.  Repeat x 5
(5 shots)
Total 50 shots

The above is just one example of a set of drill combinations you can do in one session on one target…  seven workouts, multiple iterations, one box of ammunition, one target.  You’re limited only by your imagination.

Finally, it might surprise you to learn that the PTI Target is based on the dimensions of an actual person.  If you were to superimpose this IALEFI target on top of PTI, you’d see that the various target numbers line up with skeletal features on this guy:

You can get the PTI target at MULTIDRILL .

Ted is also on Facebook at Multi Drill Targets.

A portion of the proceeds from every sale goes to support our mission.

Fundraiser 2015.1

  • Prize:  1 seat in any two-day defensive firearm class and 500 rounds of carbine ammunition (5.56 or 7.62 x 39)
  • Cost per ticket:  $20

Number of tickets:  50

The drawing will be held when the 50th ticket is sold.

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Contact me for details.

FLORENCE GUNSHOW

Hope to see you at Mike Kent’s Civic Center Gunshow, 2 – 3 MAY.   We’ll be at our usual spot.

URBAN BREAK CONTACT V REPORT

The UBC class last March was fantastic.  The week before the class we had two teams (4 students) drop out for various reasons so the final count for the class was only four students.  This turned out to be a good thing.  All had attended multiple Paladin basic and advanced defensive firearm classes and three of the four had attended at least one UBC prior to this one.  Two of the students had multiple combat tours and one is still active duty USMC.  Due to the skill level these four students brought to the class, UBC-V turned into a Beta Class for testing a new curriculum.
The review material that typically takes up much of Friday was shortened and we launched into the scenario after lunch the first day; half a day early.  Over the next two days, the scenario gradually got more complicated (read as ‘realistic’) as we moved from two man teams to four man teams.

Pistols played a more important role in this UBC than in previous iterations, so much so that I’m thinking of adding Defensive Handgun 1 to the list of training prerequisites necessary to attend UBC in the future.

By Sunday, the students were fighting their way from the disabled car, engaging targets as they moved to cover with their sidearms, recovering long guns and other mission essential gear while the BG’s were suppressed by their team-mates, then completing the disengagement.  It was a complicated but beautifully choreographed and executed dance and very gratifying to see performed so well.

Various complications were thrown at them to force them to think and improvise on the run.

We added a second range car to the training.  We moved the two cars around.  First the car with the BG’s was in front of the car occupied by the students.  Later, we moved it to represent a situation where the car containing the GG’s was t-boned on the passenger side by the BG’s and everyone had to egress the car on the driver side.

Also on Sunday, we changed the justification for the scenario from the original, which reflected an historic event involving Private Security Contractors in Kabul, Afghanistan to one unfortunately more relevant to life in America:  Imagine you and a buddy are driving on any Interstate Hwy in America and you’re approaching a typical urban area.  As you near the center of the city, you observe multiple brake lights ahead and you assume an accident has just happened.  You slow down and eventually come to a stop behind a line of cars.  Meanwhile, cars are continually stopping behind you, blocking you in.  Suddenly you realize men armed with AK47’s are walking down the line of stopped cars, in your direction, shooting the occupants and anyone fleeing.

It’s not an accident at all.  Two car loads of ISIS sympathizers have come to a stop under an overpass completely blocking forward  movement.  Everyone behind them is trapped.  You and your buddy can’t go left or right because of lane dividers and sound barriers.  You can’t go forward or backward because of stopped cars.  The fact that YOU left maneuver room between your vehicle and that in front of you is totally irrelevant.  Your vehicle is effectively immobilized.  What do you do?

If you doubt the potential for such an event in America, I urge you to read William Forstchen’s novella DAY OF WRATH without delay and reconsider.

A word about Safety

As with all previous UBC’s, every attempt was made to provide as realistic training as possible.  In my opinion, next to lack of instructor experience and ability, the biggest obstacle to realistic training is a hyperfocus on SAFETY.  We did nothing that was unsafe, but we did things that would be unsafe if done improperly.  We zealously complied with the Four General Firearm Safety Rules.  We did everything we could reasonably do to minimize training scars.

I do not normally give permission for students to post video of the training on public sites like YouTube because, frankly, I don’t have the patience to deal with arm chair experts who don’t understand, or care about, the context of what they’re looking at.  All I’ll say is this:  I felt safer DOWNRANGE of these four men engaging targets past me than I do BEHIND THE LINE of the typical CWP class.  This was partly due to our training, partly due to our ability to set up the target engagement angles properly, partly due to safeguards we put in place, but mostly due to the maturity and skill level of the students.

This is important

The technical factors that made the greatest contribution to safe movement and target engagement were SITUATIONAL AWARENESS and COMMUNICATION.  Think about that.

Finally, I want to thank Kerry Alzner who came down from NC to assist with the class.  Kerry has an SF and PSC background, has seen the elephant more than once, and his expertise added much to the training.

What’s Next?

  1. Future UBC’s will be smaller, probably capped at two two man teams.
  2. They will cost more, probably in the area of $600 for Paladin alumni.
  3. The round count will go up for both long gun and handgun.
  4. Additional training prerequisites will be put in place:  Probably Defensive Handgun 1 and Defensive Carbine 2.
  5. I hope we’ll have more than one a year as is current practice.

Edition 59

I hope you and your team had a blessed Christmas!  I encourage you to see this new year as an incentive to train and get ready.

Train hard; put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Attempted Carjacking / Florence, SC

A few weeks back the daughter of one of our students was the intended victim of a carjacking.  As she headed into town, approaching the intersection of National Cemetery Road and South Barringer Street (about two blocks east of Church Street) a man and woman stepped in front of her car, forcing her to stop.  The female ran away, but the man tried began to pound on the driver’s side window and tried to enter the driver’s door of her car.  Thankfully the door was locked.  She sped away and avoided a carjacking or worse.

Reminders

  1. Keep your car doors locked!
  2. There are three ‘inputs’ in your car. Any and all may be appropriate in a situation.  Keep an open mind.
    1. brakes
    2. throttle
    3. steering wheel
  3. A critical component of Situational Awareness is playing ‘what if’ games.  ‘What would I do / where would I go if those two people tried to stop me?’
  4. If you fear for your life, your car may be the appropriate weapon for the situation.  It’s a better ‘stopper’ than a handgun… and you’ve already got your hands on it.
  5. Was it ‘reasonable’ for her to assume the man was attempting a carjacking?  I think that’s obvious.  According to Section 16.1.60 of the SC Code, carjacking is a crime of violence and deadly force may be used to stop one if necessary.

Tragic Shooting in Idaho

You’ve probably heard about the 2 y/o child shooting and killing his mother in an Idaho Wal-Mart.  While she was shopping, and presumably not paying attention to him, he accessed the concealed handgun in her purse and accidentally shot her.

The 29 year old mother had a concealed weapons permit issued by the state of Washington.  Unless I missed something while researching the issue, there is NO TRAINING REQUIREMENT to obtain a WACWP.

What a senseless tragedy.  He will live with this until that day when all tears are wiped away.

Please, please, please keep  your firearms secure!  If a handgun is carried in a purse it should be in a dedicated (not shared with anything else) and CLOSED compartment.

Obviously, the safest place to keep the weapon is on your body.  You have greater control over it, plus you’re less likely to forget about it.

The ripples from this event can have long lasting consequences beyond the obvious.  In my experience, one certainty is that some in that family or circle of friends will turn away from firearms.  That’s not a bad thing in itself, but it can become a bad thing if one day in the future their life or the life of a loved one could have been spared if only they had a gun available and knew how to use it.

Strange… people will ride in a car to the funeral of a loved one killed by a drunk driver and not think a thing of it.  There’s no linkage at all in their mind.  But, people every day forever turn against firearms because one was misused in some event close to home.  Makes no sense to me.

Donate

Today is the last day to make a tax-deductible donation to help Paladin Training in 2014.  Where does your money go?

Subsidized Training

There are two seats reserved in every defensive firearm class for local law-enforcement to attend free of charge.  About 50% of the time, Paladin is able to provide the ammunition for them to use in the class.

Other LEO’s pay only 50% of the regular tuition for a class.

Active duty military – including members of the SCARNG & SCANG pay NOTHING to attend any of our defensive firearm classes.

Equipment

Donations have enabled us to purchase some first-class targets and other training aids.  For instance, with the purchase in 2014 of the MGM ‘Attack Target’, Paladin was able to introduce more realistic and stressful drills into our carbine and handgun classes.

We’ve got big plans for 2015.  Help us out if you can!

Paladin Training is a tax exempt public charity under IRS Section 501(c)(3).  All donations are fully tax deductible.

Fundraiser 2015.1

  • Prize:  1 seat in any two-day defensive firearm class and 500 rounds of carbine ammunition (5.56 or 7.62 x 39)
  • Cost per ticket:  $20
  • Number of tickets:  50
The drawing will be held when the 50th ticket is sold.

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Contact me for details.

Counterfeit Optics?

There are a number of Chinese counterfeit copies of electronic sights on the market.  Okay for AirSoft, but not something you’d want on your social gun.
Here’s how to check an EoTech to make sure it’s real:
ISTHATREAL?

Florence Gunshow

Hope to see you NEXT weekend (10 & 11 JAN) at Mike Kent’s Civic Center Gunshow.   We’ll be at our usual spot.

Urban Break Contact!

We have a few spots available in the UBC at the end of March.  UBC is a two-person team class where the focus is on learning the skills and tactics necessary to disengage from a numerically superior force.
Past participants:  We’ve made some very meaningful changes to the curriculum.  If you’d like to come for just one or two days, I’ll be glad to prorate the tuition.  Remember that Friday is review day, so if you can only come one day, Saturday would be the best choice.  Space is limited and teams / individuals attending all three days get priority.

Contact me if you’d like the details.

Edition 58

I hope you and your team are well and continuing to diligently train and prepare.  I am so concerned about the future that I no longer believe it’s a matter of IF, but WHEN your readiness will be tested.  A CWP is just the starting point.  Having a CWP makes you a gunfighter like having a driver’s license makes you a Formula 1 driver.

Speaking of CWP…
I have a few seats available in the SC CWP class this weekend.  We keep classes small and have a hard cut-off point, so don’t wait.  If you don’t have your SC CWP, yet, knock it out now so you can start 2015 off right.

Check out the raffle info below.

Also, I’ve added another ‘regular feature’ below:

Book / Video Recommendation of the Month.

As always, hope to see you in a class soon.

Train hard; put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Gift Certificates Available…

… for all our classes.  What better gift for someone you care about than the opportunity to learn life-saving skills?  You can also think of it this way:  The life the recipient saves may be yours!

Contact me for details.

Fundraiser 2015.1

  • Prize:  1 seat in any two-day defensive firearm class and 500 rounds of carbine ammunition (5.56 or 7.62 x 39)
  • Cost per ticket:  $20
  • Number of tickets:  50

The drawing will be held when the 50th ticket is sold.

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Contact me for details.

Urban Break Contact!

We have a few spots available in the UBC at the end of March.  UBC is a two-person team class where the focus is on learning the skills and tactics necessary to disengage from a numerically superior force.

Past participants:  We’ve made some very meaningful changes to the curriculum.  If you’d like to come for just one or two days, I’ll be glad to prorate the tuition.  Remember that Friday is review day, so if you can only come one day, Saturday would be the best choice.  Space is limited and teams / individuals attending all three days get priority.

Contact me if you’d like the details.

Recommended Other Sources

You should consider subscribing to:
1.  Paul Howe of CSAT.  Paul writes a monthly newsletter I enjoy mainly because it affirms my beliefs.  Listen, the world is mostly populated with people who don’t think like I do and, quite frankly, it’s encouraging to be reminded now and then that there are other people like myself out there.  Find him at:
www.combatshootingandtactics.com2.  Claude Werner, the Tactical Professor.  Claude is another no-nonsense / tell it like it is even if it hurts guy.  Always thought provoking.  Find him at:
www.tacticalprofessor.wordpress.com

3.  John Farnam of Defense Training Int’l.  John is like the historian / poet laureate of gun writers.  He’s also one of the two instructors most responsible for Paladin’s approach and curriculum.  Check out his ‘QUIPS’ at:
www.defense-training.com

4.  John Holschen — John is the other trainer who, along with John Farnam, is most responsible for my grounding.  John’s excellent online videos – ‘Tactical Moment’ — can be found at:
www.gunsandtactics.com

Speaking of Other Trainers

Yes, I encourage you to attend other schools.  Be forewarned:  The fact that someone was an Operator or member of a SEAL Team doesn’t automatically mean they’re a competent trainer or, even if a good trainer, that they have something to say that’s relevant to your situation.

I have been blessed by the choices I made in schools / trainers.  I purposefully chose trainers from different tactical backgrounds to gain the broader view.  I wanted to see how their perspectives differed.  I also purposefully chose experienced, established trainers with a certain reputation.

Those that I would train under again have these attributes:
They are more interested in developing the gunfighter in you than a cult following for themselves.
They would rather credit the elders than have a new technique named after them.

They are all perpetual students, constantly seeking to better themselves and further the craft.

In a word, they (most of them) are humble.

I have purposefully avoided those trainers who seem to have developed a cult following, or those who seem overly dogmatic.

My advice?

Beware the trainer who has zealots for disciples.
Beware the trainer who says ‘This is the only way to do this’, or ‘I have THE answer’.

Be cautious of dogma.

Here’s who I can recommend thru first hand experience, along with their background:
  • Massad Ayoob – Law Enforcement (LE) & private citizen
  • John Farnam – USMC, LE & private citizen
  • John Holschen – USA (DELTA)
  • Tom Givens – LE & private citizen
  • Jim Higginbotham – LE & private citizen
  • Ed Stock – USA, Arizona DPS & Gunsite
  • Ed Head – US Border Patrol & Gunsite
  • Jeff Gonzalez – USN (SEAL)
  • Bill Jeans – USMC & Gunsite
  • Larry Vickers – USA (DELTA)
  • Paul Howe – USA (DELTA)

Edition 57

I hope you and your team are well and continuing to diligently train and prepare.  You are betting your life your enemy isn’t.

This will be a short newsletter with a focus on upcoming classes.

I sincerely wish for you and those who care for you a safe, peaceful and happy Thanksgiving Day.  May you have just the right amount of food and family and no more of either than is good for your comfort and peace of mind.

As always, hope to see you in a class soon.

Train hard; put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Gift Certificates Available…

… for all our classes.  What better gift for someone you care about than the opportunity to learn life-saving skills?  You can also think of it this way:  The life they save may be yours!

Contact me for details.

Last weekend’s DC2. Gave it 110% in cold, rain and dark and made it a great class!

Urban Break Contact!

We have spots available in the UBC next weekend.  UBC is a two-person team class where the focus is on learning the skills and tactics necessary to disengage from a numerically superior force.
Past participants:  We’ve made some very meaningful changes to the curriculum.  If you’d like to come for just one or two days, I’ll be glad to prorate the tuition.  Remember that Friday is review day, so if you can only come one day, Saturday would be the best choice.  Space is limited and teams / individuals attending all three days get priority.

Contact me if you’d like the details.

Student Appreciation Days

In past years we’ve set up the range and invited past participants of the UBC to come shoot the UBC Standard Course of Fire.  Never any charge, this was just one way to say ‘thank you’ to the people that invested their time and treasure with us.  We’ll do that again early in 2015.

Well, MGM’s ‘Attack Target’ has turned out to be a phenomenal training tool and I’ve decided to host a separate range day where you can come pit yourself against it all you wish.  Just like the UBC Standards Day, ‘Attack Target Day’ is free, but you must have completed either DH1 or DC1 to shoot against it.

You can see a factory promo on the Attack Target here:

MGM ATTACK TARGET

Here’s one drill we run in carbine classes using the Attack Target:

At night, in darkness, the student faces up range, approximately one yard off the center-line of the track, armed with a light equipped carbine.  The light is turned off, the carbine is in Condition 1 and at a low ready.  The target is 21 feet away.

An instructor has modified the face of the target by fastening a mock up of either a contact weapon (such as a knife or club) or a benign object (such as a coffee cup) to the face of it.

The student is given the command ‘LOOK!’.

The student must step aggressively off the line as he / she turns 180 degrees to face the target.  When the student’s strong side foot hits the ground the Attack Target is released.  Within 1.5 seconds the student must perform these actions:

  1. Establish a fighting position;
  2. Use the light to identify the target from a ready position (to avoid a Rule 2 violation);
  3. If the target is non-threatening, the student must recognize this and quickly move off-line to avoid getting hit by the on-coming target;
  4. If the target represents a deadly force Threat, the student must recognize this, get three hits with the carbine, then quickly move off-line to avoid getting hit by the on-coming target.

Did I say in less than 1.5 seconds?

It can be done and is done successfully in every Defensive Carbine, Defensive Handgun and Low Light Handgun class.  The most beautiful thing, from an instructor’s perspective, is to see the students’ skill level and confidence increase over multiple engagements.  Finally, and we can generally sense this from the rear in the way the student moves, he or she gets it all together… gets ‘in the zone’.  After such a run, the student will invariably turn and say something like, ‘I thought I had ALL the time in the world to do that!’

And that is a truly wonderful thing.

Also on Attack Target Day, we’ll bring out the ‘DRT’ (Dreaded Rotator Target) and let past participants of DH1 (old BDH) come shoot against it.  Those of you who have shot against, and been frustrated by, the Rotator need no reminders about how it works.

I’ll keep you posted via the newsletter as to when UBC Standards Day and Attack Target Day will happen.

Bring a lot of ammunition.  Come shoot until your arms fall off.  And, thank you for training with us!

Edition 56

I hope you and your team are well and continuing to diligently train and prepare for the day that is surely coming.
The focus of this newsletter is crime prevention.  I find it useful sometimes to talk about ‘preparedness’ issues because they have a direct bearing on crime prevention.

For instance, if your family has not prepared for  drought, famine or plague (pestilence), etc., then, at some level, your hope is in the government.

This means you’ll have to join other ill prepared people like yourself heading to or at government run ‘distribution centers.’   And that means you and whatever family members accompanying you are more likely to become victims of crime (think SuperDome) or, with today’s headlines in mind, disease.  And those family members left behind at home are more likely to become victims of crime since you’re not there to protect them.

It’s probably worthwhile to study the likelihood that the Federal government can even handle an emergency of national proportion.

On the other side of the coin, being prepared will certainly designate you as a target.  I know without a doubt many people see no need to prepare now because they plan to just take your stuff when they need it.  Why sacrifice?  Just take from those that have.

Aesop’s post-modern grasshopper would have stolen the ant’s stores upon being told ‘You should have prepared’.

So, you have to decide:

  1. Not prepare and possibly suffer the consequences, along with my family?  Maybe become one of those formerly ‘good’ people that are, out of desperation, forced to become thieves and robbers?
    Don’t say you won’t do that.  Unless you have watched a family member starve to death or die of thirst or die slowly because they lack medication, when taking from someone who had food, water and meds might have prevented it, then you don’t know what you’ll do when that time comes.
  2. Prepare to live and – concurrently – prepare to kill people in Category 1 when they come for your food, water and meds.

The choice is yours.

Not too soon to start thinking about gift certificates for training as a Christmas present.  They’re available for every class.

It’s also not too soon to start thinking about the UBC in December.  We’ve made some major revisions to the curriculum, making the scenario more challenging and realistic.  Don’t forget DC1 is a prerequisite for DC2 and UBC and CO1 is a prerequisite for DC1.

As always, hope to see you in a class soon.

Train hard; put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Attention Fathers and Sons

My good friend and fellow soldier Pastor Tim McKnight has created something  that might interest you.  Kingdom Paladins is an organization that seeks to help parents raise up their sons to be spiritual warriors who help advance the Kingdom of Christ.  Check out the FaceBook page by that name.

Day of Wrath Revisited

Last newsletter I recommended you download and read William Forstchen’s DAY OF WRATH.  If you have read it, then the following will make perfect sense to you.

We’ve put together a Counter Vehicle Ambush training day using our two ‘range’ cars around this scenario:
You’re driving in the slow lane on a four lane highway.  You have at least one passenger with you.  You notice a car overtaking you in the fast lane.  Each time the car pulls alongside the cars behind you they swerve off the road and wreck.  This happens every time the car in the fast lane pulls abreast a slower car behind you.

What do you do?

Probably my first choice would be to slip into the fast lane, pull away (if I could), and take the first exit.  If Paladin Training was a driving academy, that would be the school solution.  End of class.  Thank you for your attention.

But, Paladin Training is about fighting with guns.  I’m not qualified to teach you evasive driving.  So, we’re not going to let you drive away.  In our scenario, as is usually the case when you really need to get somewhere quickly, like ‘somewhere else’, there are two cars abreast of each other ahead of  you.  The car in the fast lane is going 1/10 of one mph faster than the car in the right and your birthday will come before you can pass.

Now, what do you do?  Now would be a good time to check out the videos at  About ISIL if you haven’t already done so to better understand your predicament.

I call this a training day rather than a class because we’re all going to learn from the experience.  We have two donated ‘range’ cars at the range.  One has taken a lot of hits over the years and is ready for the recycling station, the other is pristine.  Let’s call the pristine car ‘GC’ and the shot up car ‘BC’.

First we’ll place BC down range and shoot at designated hard points from an angle behind it, as if we’re the BG’s overtaking a car from the rear.  We want to see what protection the car provides, if any, from bullets coming at an angle from the rear.

Next, we’ll turn the BC around so that it’s facing uprange and put cardboard targets in the two front seats and one in the back seat passenger side.  The GC will be parked uprange of it and offset to the right as if it’s the car in the slow lane being overtaken.  We’ll put two students in the GC.  At the signal, the student in the passenger seat will climb into the rear seat and engage the cardboard ‘occupants’ of the BC with his carbine.  We’ll each have a chance to see how well our carbine load penetrates windshields (we’re collecting extra windshields now) and sheet metal.  I’m sure we’ll learn some other things, too.

  • Prerequisite:  This is open only to past UBC participants.
  • Date:  Saturday, 20 DEC.
  • Location:  Lake Darpo, Society Hill, SC
  • Cost:  No charge

Even though there’s no charge, I’ll need a headcount so contact me if interested.

Open Carry?

A couple of months ago ‘open carry’ or ‘Constitutional Carry’ advocates — mainly in Texas — were much in the news.  With their in your face activities they created adversarial relationships where up to that point a sort of ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy had ruled.  I’ve been meaning to write about it, but have put it off because I didn’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings.  With that in mind…

 

See this?

Dumb and Dumber

Dumb and Dumber

The behavior of ‘Dumb’ and ‘Dumber’ above is so stupid I question whether or not they should even be allowed to own real guns.

A Tactical Issue

So much for the element of surprise, an absolutely essential ingredient in a defensive situation where, by definition, you are reacting to a situation already in progress.  Any dedicated BG walking into that establishment will simply assassinate these two first.  Or, rob them.  Seriously.  Check this out:  I LIKE YOUR GUN

The same goes for wearing handguns in the open.  You can’t control who comes within arm’s length of you in a crowded environment, or simply standing in line at a theater or check out line, etc.  As we go about the business of life we are often simply surrounded by strangers.  Hide the gun.  That’s your best retention device.

A Political Issue

Many, if not most, of the businesses I visit are ambivalent about the 2A to the Constitution.  While it’s not my first choice, I’m okay with that.  I don’t knowingly do business with people / companies that are openly hostile on the issue, but as long as they practice ‘live and let live’, I’m okay.

Businesses exist to make a profit.  Any overt behavior that negatively impacts that, like scaring customers away because we walked into the place openly carrying a firearm, will understandably bring about a reaction against that behavior.  We should not have a problem with companies that are protecting their legitimate interests.  Live and let live works both ways.

Starbucks’ CEO Howard Shultz said, ‘Guns should not be a part of the Starbucks experience’.  He’s absolutely right!  If I’m in Starbucks, I’m there to enjoy a cup of coffee and would prefer not to have to wonder about the intentions of a private citizen — a total stranger — walking through the door wearing a handgun or AR.  And, if I anticipate that situation, I’ll probably just not go there.

A good question:  What takes precedence, Steve, yours preferences or the Constitution?  The Constitution, obviously, but ‘because I CAN’ do something is not necessarily justification for doing it.

The way to win this battle is through education and respect.  Respect… that’s all we want from them, right?

I encourage you to read Mr. Schultz’ comments on the issue here:  STARBUCKS

A “You’re Going to Get Yourself Shot” Issue

We teach that a handgun in a holster does not in and of itself represent a threat.  On the other hand, putting your hand on the grip will be seen as an escalation of force and the message it carries is, ‘I’m getting ready.’  Likewise, a long gun slung or hanging by a two point sling is considered safe and does not, in and of itself, represent a threat.  So, acquiring a firing grip on a slung long gun , as pictured above, may likely be seen as an escalation of force and carry with it the same message:  ‘I’m getting ready.’

What would you think if you and your family were eating out and you saw someone coming through the door with their hand on a handgun?  Get ready to fight or flee!  Well, you should probably think the same thing if you see someone walk thru the door holding a long gun in a firing grip.

One of these days, some unthinking but otherwise innocent open carry advocate is going to get shot by some concealed carry advocate.  No matter how justifiable it may be, that’s not going to help us.

A Side Technical Issue

When it is correct to wear a long gun, please don’t use a single point sling.  The design practically forces you to keep your hand on the gun while you  move and, as discussed above, this might be seen as threatening.

But, there’s another problem with single point slings.  Check out the video here, specifically between the 8:35 and 9:25 marks for graphic evidence of the danger inherent in using them, and the reason they’re banned in our carbine classes:

Edition 55

I hope you and your team are well and continuing to diligently train and prepare for that day.

 

I have lost track of who’s coming to the Carbine Operator course this weekend.  If you’re planning to attend, please contact me ASAP.

 

I’ve made an adjustment to the format of the newsletter:  Reminders about UPCOMING CLASSES have been inserted into the left column beneath the Training Calendar.  Also, I’ve added links to some of the class descriptions so you don’t have to call and ask.

 

Not too soon to start thinking about gift certificates for training as a Christmas present.  They’re available for every class.

 

It’s also not too soon to start thinking about the UBC in December.  We’ve made some major revisions to the curriculum, making the scenario more challenging and realistic.  Don’t forget DC1 is a prerequisite for DC2 and UBC and CO1 is a prerequisite for DC1.

 

As always, hope to see you in a class soon.

 

Train hard; put God first!

Steve

DVC/I H S

Book Recommendation

I very strongly recommend you download and read William Forstchen’s DAY OF WRATH.

This is a timely and urgent book about ISIL attacking targets inside the US.  Forstchen has simply taken actions these animals have already committed elsewhere and set them in small towns in the United States.  Nothing speculative about it.

Since 2002 or so, when it became apparent the Islamists had failed to achieve their purpose, I and others have been warning that the next attack would be directed at the heartland of America.

Listen, we can talk about everyone being a citizen of NYC if it makes us feel better, but the truth of the matter is the attacks of 9-11-01 took place far, far away from the majority of America.  NYC and DC might as well be on the moon for all the thought I give them each day.

But, if terrorists simultaneously attacked school buses filled with kids as they went about their routes in different rural areas across America, that would forever change the lives of millions of Americans.  Imagine the same thing taking place at high school football or basketball games across America.  Things would change.  If you believe you have less freedom as a result of The Patriot Act, you haven’t seen anything like the repressive laws that would come about in the wake of this type of event.

We are led by people who ‘never let a good crisis go to waste’.

I do believe it’s just a matter of time.

We can and must ready ourselves.  We must ready our families.

Read more here about the book and:  AboutISIL

Please remember to use www.smile.amazon.com and support Paladin Training’s mission.  I’d link directly to the book but I can’t figure out how to do it without linking my account.

Death of a Firearm Instructor

I’m sure you’ve heard about the instructor killed when a 9 year old student lost control of a fully automatic pistol.  I probably shouldn’t use the terms ‘instructor’ and ‘student’ when talking about the relationship between these two people.  That event was about amusement, not training.

 

But, what a tragic story for everyone involved!  A husband, father and veteran is dead in his prime, a young girl is surely traumatized and likely robbed of a future that, until this occurred, included at least the hypothetical chance of learning how to defend herself with a firearm.

 

Plenty has already been said and written about fault so I’ll fore go that.  Let’s talk instead a little about training kids to shoot.  Really, I could use some training in that area myself as (a) Paladin is not in the business of training young children in gun safety, and (b) Libby and I don’t have children.

 

It doesn’t take any skill and not a whole lot of physical strength to ‘shoot’ a gun.  Very young people can support (i.e., hold) and fire a gun.  The important question is this:

 

Can they CONTROL the gun during recoil?

 

If you intend to supervise a young person shooting a SEMI-AUTO,  load the gun as a single shot, charging the magazine with only one round, until they have demonstrated the ability to handle the recoil.

 

People are dead because they fired guns that recoiled more than they could control:  Hit in the top of the head by barrels, hit in the head by rounds unintentionally fired while the gun was in full recoil, etc.

 

Maybe because it’s what I learned on, I think the ideal handgun for teaching a new shooter the fundamentals of marksmanship is a Ruger Single Six revolver in .22 LR.

 

Consider these points:

  1. Inherently accurate
  2. Cheap ammunition
  3. Little recoil and blast
  4. Has to be manually cocked for each shot, effectively making it a single shot
  5. Good sights and trigger
  6. Rugged and durable
  7. Won’t be ‘outgrown’
    And lastly, seemingly at odds to the purpose of shooting well…
  8. Has a long, relatively slow hammer fall

Number 8 is actually a plus, from a training standpoint, because it means that the shooter must concentrate on the fundamental of ‘Follow Thru’ in order to shoot the gun well.

In essence you have a gun that is accurate, but you have to work a little more to shoot it accurately.

If you take this advice seriously, might as well get the convertible version that comes with a .22 WMR cylinder.  This will greatly increase the versatility of the gun.

If you want to learn a little more about the firearm that was used in the incident in Arizona, here’s a YouTube video on the Micro Uzi:

Interestingly, and perhaps relevant to the accident in Arizona, in his opening remarks the shooter mentions a problem with the folding stock.  He says it’s common.  I haven’t a clue as I’ve never fired one.  But, you can see it happen around the 4:30 mark.  Notice that, when the stock comes loose, the muzzle moves to the left and up… where the instructor was positioned.

Castle Doctrine in Chesterfield County

Cast of characters:

  • Gaskins – the shooter / driver
  • Burr – the witness / passenger
  • Turner – the deceased
  • Two juveniles – sons of Gaskins and Burr / back-seat passengers

In August 2013, Gaskins drove Burr and the two boys to Turner’s house to retrieve some medication for Burr’s son.  Turner and Burr’s estranged wife were living together.

Turner met them in the front yard, carrying a baseball bat and acting in an agitated manner.  It would later be determined his BAC was .21%.

According to Gaskins, Turner opened the PASSENGER side door, pointed the bat at Burr and threatened the two men with bodily harm.  Gaskins said he tried to get Turner to step away but he ‘wouldn’t get away from the car’.  Gaskins said he feared for their safety, pulled a pistol from his pocket and shot Turner three times.  Turner died at the scene.  Gaskins was arrested and charged with murder.

At a pre-trial hearing, Gaskins’ attorney sought immunity from prosecution under the Protection of Persons and Property Act.  Circuit Judge Henry James recently rendered the opinion that the PPPA does not apply, which means the case will go to trial.  I think he’s correct.

Disclaimer #1: All the above comes from the Florence Morning News.  You can read it here: SCNow

Disclaimer #2: I am not a  lawyer.  What follows is not legal advice, etc., etc.

 

Pertinent Sections of The Protection of Persons and Property Act (PPPA)   

(Read it in full here:  16-11-410 )

SECTION 16-11-440. Presumption of reasonable fear of imminent peril when using deadly force against another unlawfully entering residence, occupied vehicle or place of business.

(A) A person is presumed to have a reasonable fear of imminent peril of death or great bodily injury to himself or another person when using deadly force that is intended or likely to cause death or great bodily injury to another person if the person:

(1) against whom the deadly force is used is in the process of unlawfully and forcefully entering, or has unlawfully and forcibly entered a dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle, or if he removes or is attempting to remove another person against his will from the dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle; and

(2) who uses deadly force knows or has reason to believe that an unlawful and forcible entry or unlawful and forcible act is occurring or has occurred.

(C) A person who is not engaged in an unlawful activity and who is attacked in another place where he has a right to be, including, but not limited to, his place of business, has no duty to retreat and has the right to stand his ground and meet force with force, including deadly force, if he reasonably believes it is necessary to prevent death or great bodily injury to himself or another person or to prevent the commission of a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60.
(D) A person who unlawfully and by force enters or attempts to enter a person’s dwelling, residence, or occupied vehicle is presumed to be doing so with the intent to commit an unlawful act involving force or a violent crime as defined in Section 16-1-60.

In his argument against immunity the prosecutor mentioned several discrepancies in the witness testimony.  It had to be extremely damaging to the defense that Burr testified he never felt in danger until Gaskins began shooting!  Ouch!

When considering the question of going to the aid of another, this is my worst fear:  The person I’m rescuing doesn’t understand the danger he’s in and so he doesn’t appreciate the reasonableness of what I did by shooting his attacker.

Either that is what happened here or Burr’s assessment of the situation is correct and Gaskins over-reacted.

Whichever, the problem posed by going to the aid of someone who may not understand they’re in danger should be a very real concern for you.  Remember that there are situations where your training might cause you to act before others who are untrained.

Here’s the problem I have with the shooting:  In my reading of the events, nothing leads me to believe that it was NECESSARY for Gaskins to shoot Turner in order to save his or Burr’s life.

That’s a big word and it’s right smack in the middle of Paragraph C above.  I fear we sometimes take too much comfort in the extensions to the Castle Doctrine included in the PPPA and neglect the concept of NECCESITY.  It appears to me that the problem would have disappeared had Gaskins simply put the car in gear and driven away from the indisputably angry and intoxicated Turner.  Once at a safe distance, he or Burr could have called the SO and had a deputy escort Burr to Turner’s place to get the meds for the boy.   End of story / no one shot / no one arrested.

I agree with the decision.

Recommended Newsletter

I think I’ve mentioned him before, but it’s worth a reminder:  If you’re interested in learning more about the legal issues surrounding the use of force, check out  Andrew Branca’s website here:  LOSD

Branca periodically publishes a newsletter that I’ve found interesting.  I know I’ve previously recommended his book The Law of Self Defense.